Category Archives: News

Shortlisted for the Saltire National Book Awards 2021, Best Research Book of the Year

We are thrilled that Darkness Visible has been short-listed for the Research Award in Scotland’s National Book Awards 2021. The archaeology of the Sculptor’s Cave has much to teach us about life and death in prehistoric Scotland and beyond. The short-listing is testament to the important role of archaeology in telling stories about the past which have the power to move us in the present.” Society of Antiquaries of Scotland

More information here.

Nigel Leask, Stepping Westward: Writing the Highland Tour c.1720-1830 (Oxford: OUP, 2020)

Curious Travellers are delighted to announce a major new publication. Here, Nigel Leask explains what this book sets out to do.

Stepping Westward grew out of the wider research on Pennant’s Welsh and Scottish tours central to Curious Travellers: that’s why the chapter on Pennant’s Scottish tours is really the keystone of the book. It’s the first study of its kind dedicated to the literature of the Scottish Highland tour 1720-1830, which attracted writers and artists like Pennant, Johnson and Boswell, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Hogg, Keats, Daniell, and Turner, as well as numerous less celebrated travellers and tourists. Addressing more than a century’s worth of literary and visual accounts of the Highlands, the book casts new light on how the tour developed a modern literature of place, acting as a catalyst for thinking about improvement, landscape, and the shaping of British, Scottish and Gaelic identities. Special attention is paid to the relationship between travellers and the native Gaels, whose world was plunged into crisis by rapid and forced social change in the wake of Culloden. The best-selling tours of Pennant and Dr Johnson, alongside the Ossian craze and Gilpin’s picturesque, stimulated a wave of ‘home tours’ from the 1770s through the romantic period, including writing by women like Sarah Murray and Dorothy Wordsworth. The incidence of published Highland Tours (many lavishly illustrated), peaked around 1800, but as the genre reached exhaustion, the ‘romantic Highlands’ were reinvented in Scott’s poems and novels, coinciding with steam boats and mass tourism, but also rack-renting, sheep clearance and emigration.”

More information.

Research Visitor to Curious Travellers from India.

We are delighted to welcome Professor Debarati Bandyopadhyay (Department of English, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan, India) who is currently on a month-long Visiting Fellowship in Glasgow working with the Curious Travellers team (July 6th-3rd August 2018). Debarati’s research is concerned with the intersection of ecocriticism and geocriticism, with a special emphasis on Thomas Pennant and the 18th century origins of the ‘New’ Nature Writing. She was a Post-Doctoral Fellow in India (2010-11), and an International Visiting Fellow at the University of Essex (2017): her invitation to Glasgow was extended by Prof Leask on behalf of the whole Curious Travellers team.  She is currently in Special Collections at Glasgow University Library poring over early editions of Thomas Pennant’s works, in search of signs of ‘New’ Nature Writing in this extensive collection. Debarati may be contacted here for academic discussions – we look forward to her further collaborations with the project, and wish her the best for her research on Thomas Pennant.

18th Century Scottish Studies 31st Annual Conference, Kelvin Hall, Argyle St, University of Glasgow. 17th – 21st July 2018

Our project panel will be held on Saturday 21st July, 10.45-12.15.

Curious Travellers: Thomas Pennant’s Scottish Tours and Networks

Chair: Gerry Carruthers (Glasgow)
Nigel Leask (Glasgow), ‘Ossianic Networks: Pennant, Dr Johnson, and Donald MacQueen of Kilmuir’
Alex Deans (Glasgow), ‘Authority, Locality and History in Thomas Pennant’s Scottish Networks’
Kirsty McHugh (U. of Wales/NLS), ‘In the Footsteps of Pennant and Johnson: Reverend James Bailey’s 1787 Highland Tour’

 

June 14th 1726, Thomas Pennant’s Birthday

(Downing Hall by Moses Griffith, National Library of Wales, on Wikimedia Commons)

“To prevent all disputes about the place and time of my birth, be it known that I was born on June 14th, 1726, old style, in the room now called the Yellow Room; that the celebrated Mrs Clayton, of Shrewsbury, ushered me into the world, and delivered me to Miss Jenny Parry, of Merton, in the parish; who to her dying day never failed telling me. ‘Ah, you rogue! I remember you when you had not a shirt to your back’”.

Pennant, The History of the Parishes of Whiteford and Holywell (1796)

To see where Pennant spent his birthday in 1772 go to:

http://curioustravellers.ac.uk/map/#zoom=10&lat=55.8947&lon=-4.0344&point=55.86424,-4.25181

Curious Travellers: Update and Events 2018

Moses Griffith, Penmaen Bach from Penmaen Mawr Road: from the extra-illustrated Tours in Wales
[https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Penmaenbach_from_Penmaen_Mawr_road.jpg]

Preparing texts

The research team has been focused for the last few months on preparing selections of letters and tours for online publication. We are planning to launch the first batch of these at a conference to be held this November in the Linnaean Society in London (details below). Getting texts ready for digital publication has proved to be quite a challenge, involving technical aspects (such as tagging names) that go well beyond the usual editorial tasks. But this will make it possible to search the material in many different ways: it should lead to some interesting new angles on Pennant’s correspondence, and will help us to understand how later writers and travellers used his work.  We are, as ever, hugely grateful to our technical team, Luca Guariento and Vivien Williams, for having made this complex process as easy as possible for us.

Exhibition and Events October-December 2018  

The project is in its final year of funding, and we plan to celebrate four very busy years with a series of events in London, centred on a three-month exhibition to be held in the wonderful setting of the Dr Johnson House Museum.  Working with Curator Celine Luppo McDaid, we will explore the famous Highland tour made by Johnson and Boswell in 1775 and its relation to Pennant’s own tours. The letters and tour diaries of Hester Piozzi – Johnson’s close friend and Pennant’s neighbour and relation – will also be included.  Various events are planned during the course of the exhibition: please note the following dates!

4 October: Exhibition Opens: Curious Travellers: Dr Johnson and Thomas Pennant on Tour

30 October: Dr Mary-Ann Constantine will give a lecture to the Cymmrodorion Society

15 November (evening event): Professor Murray Pittock and Professor Nigel Leask will give talks on Johnson and Pennant.

16 November: Day conference and launch of digital texts in the Linnaean Society, Burlington House

14 December: An evening of poetry and music at the Dr Johnson House with Scottish and Welsh writers Alec Finlay and Ifor ap Glyn.

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Johnson#/media/File:Samuel_Johnson_by_Joshua_Reynolds.jpg]

Curious Travellers: Thomas Pennant and the Welsh and Scottish Tour 1760-1820

In collaboration with
National Library of Wales

Exhibition: 5-9 February 2018, Summers Room

Lunchtime talk: 1pm, 7 February 2018, the Drwm.

Mary-Ann Constantine will explore the highlights of a four-year project on the Tours of Thomas Pennant (1726–1798) and those who followed in his footsteps. A selection of Pennant’s books and manuscripts will be on display throughout the week in the Library’s Summers Room.

Event held in English

Free admission with ticket

A new itinerary added to the map

We’re excited to announce the addition of a new itinerary to our map viewer: Samuel Johnson and James Boswell’s 1773 tour to the Hebrides. This will allow us to visualize the ways in which these influential tours of Scotland overlapped and diverged, and of course, see how they line up next to a selection of historical maps provided by the NLS. Pennant and Johnson might have been less happy to see their travels presented side by side. Annoyed by a ‘fling’ at him in Johnson’s Tour, and perhaps by the competition it represented to his own Voyage to the Hebrides, Pennant asked his correspondent George Paton to look out for ‘any strictures’ on Johnson in the press, and wrote that he would not acknowledge Johnson in his own work: ‘for really he is not worth notice.’ Nonetheless, we hope that that this will be the first of several Curious Travellers crossovers between Pennant and Johnson, as we look at the impact they had upon later tourists as well as each other.